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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 588 (some duplicates have been removed)
using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these technologies encourage architects to build taller buildings. engineering and
technology. it is a great way to make one of something, which is good. perhaps you want something that is custom just for you and you don't want something mass-produced. right now the ones you buy at home, it is qaeda militants and that sort of squeeze it out. there are other ways, there are liquid resins and powders and etc. you can go to a website and you can -- they have more expensive printers and you can get things printed in titanium. stainless steel. the quality is astounding. ge 3-d prints turbine blades for jet engines. there are some limits as to what you can do with the a 3-d printer, but not many. the question is simply how long is it going to take? it took 15 years to get from a dot matrix printer where we are now. so how long it will take for the photo-quality because i don't think it's going to be 15 years. in part because it shares the same mechanical technologies. but the interesting stuff gets into materials. right now, we can be one color and plastic. the next one, we will do two colors and plastic advocates better resolution than the maximum we will be three an
. but what we really want to do is change the dialogue about how the world thinks about technology. because we really don't think it is understood or appreciated how rapidly the entire landscape is shifting because of tech. i mean, today apple's literally announcing the next iphone. that's cool, but that's just the most obvious example of things that continue to move at astonishing speed, and there's developments literally everywhere you look. and we don't think leaders generally get that. so i'm going to give you a couple of little, quick housekeeping things that we need to know. for one thing, there is an app, te space detroit, so look that up and download it, it has all the program. it'll be in realtime all day, please use the app, detroit labs made it, it's very good. te detroit is the way to get it up on the itunes store. everything here's on the record. we're really into q&a and hearing your voice from the audience. almost every session we will have you guys up here. you don't have to just ask a question, you can make a comment, but keep it brief. we're videoing and live streaming eve
. but there is dna-like technology that can catch a medal thief red-handed. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook shows us how it works and asks the question, why isn't anyone using it here? >> reporter: brazen thieves crashed a truck through a fence to get to a spool of copper wire in this pg&e yard. >> we had almost 5.2 million in copper theft over the last six years. >> reporter: in vallejo, criminals strip wiring from the electrical grid. >> over the last 18 months, we've had over 97 different locations where thieves have taken the electrical cables that power our street lights. >> reporter: that's on top of 300 places where they've stolen brass components from the water system. and across the bay area, they take metal from cemeteries, storm drains and automobiles. it's a problem not foreign to europe either, where thieves have hit hard at infrastructure. but the germans and others have found the answer to a huge problem may be a tiny dot. >> we call it the least expensive, most effective anti- theft device ever created. >> reporter: an australian- based company paints microdots on metal. you magnify
overcome these, but the whole family suffers. >> it's the technology that's set to transform the manufacturing industry. press control p and get lots of print on paper, but the pen, too. >> i think eventually it will completely transform the way products are made. >> hello. new york, the city that never sleeps. a good reason to stay awake. superstorm seaped shut down the subway system and stock exchange and the presidential election campaigning. it has been a shock to a country built on a belief in man's destiny to create a better world, but there are limits. mark was in the united states to see the devastation firsthand. >> welcome to hoboken, a poor city on the new jersey side of the hudson. places like this felt the worst of it and by the time we got there the water had already fallen by four feet. on the heights above power lines had been brought down across the street, bringing life to a halt. >> nobody was ready for this. this has never happened before, ever. i mean, it was devastating. all over. i have a house down the jersey shore that's underwater, they tell me. >> i
security czar. the beauty of both of these proposals is that the technology in the infrastructure and system in the human capital of the gses would not be reset, that could form the basis of one of these securitize theirs to compete in the private capital market going forward. so i believe that there has been some consensus around a proposal that is feasible would work. one was issued by somebody who had an ax to. that is the mortgage association, but milstein coming from the treasury department come up or simply his view is what is best for the economy, but it's a very similar proposal in my estimation and i wish that we could move ahead with them being like this then you would be tremendous benefit icing for the taxpayers to get some usefulness out of this investment that they have made in the gses and keeping them together and functioning, to use the skeleton, to use the infrastructure and awaited that allows the taxpayer to get a benefit, to get some monetization of the investment that is then made over time. .. >> i have made my decision to leave freddie mac because i thought
to think about divisions or technologies, almost allowing people to hack into people to use the city, to use it for an experiment, and a lot of people will be excited to come here and develop new services and so on. it's a very exciting bottom-up way to do things because in a top-down way, to promote innovation, you can do it, but it requires a lot of investment. it's more like top-down approach. >> so the brand is poured by. i expect most in berlin with the guggenheim getting richer and richer but this is economic activity is really booming. >> they're not competing visions. they are complementary visions, were frankly in the case of de jure, potentially this state has a very strong role. cities are creatures of the state begin to decompress mental lives these silos and stovepipes of government that cut across. that's one way. the second piece is the notion of almost like a hacker fund. let's take an issue. energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, the low carbon city, writes? which is very much off the building environment and let's see if we can move outside the building space
of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from
new technology making breast cancer detection more accurate and giving patients peace of mind. a two- time breast cancer survivor inter family turning her medical setbacks into an opportunity to help others. >> in tonight's medical watch taking radiologists eyes into deeper territory new technology boost two dimensional images into 3 d giving doctors a clearer view and patients more peace of mind. the traditional mammogram has been the gold standard because it's very good at detecting calcifications of the early stages of cancer. and can spot not jewels that a woman may not feel oneself exams, but still some patients pose a challenge to radiologists, and there is extra tissue a lesion could easily be hiding in there. like repairs this radiologist relies on conventional digital images which provide a simple projection at a single depth and now she is wearing in a new technology, three d sentencesdimensional tomo synthesis. in a single swoop on the arm of the machine captures not one but multiple pitcher's at varying depths next computer software stacks the images each in a 1 mm slice
invested in our information management systems. a lot of mobility technologies being rolled out across our organization we want to take that investment and leverage it across that network. they have over 200 locations, 4300 employees, this will wring our total work force up to 14,000 employees. we're really going to be able to have a lot more scale. we believe we really can drive margin improvement across their business. when you look at this business back in the late '90s, very successful business. it went through some real difficult times. but through those difficulties, they have a real strong brand. we're going to maintain that safety clean brand. we're going to maintain that network of the branches they have. and that will be a network. we can leverage and bring other services to their customers, particularly clean harbor's field services businesses, which is part of our emergency response business, as we talked about earlier. >> now, the conference call was interesting in that everyone seems really excited about the re-refining but there was some chatter about how the parts cleaning
cbs 5 forecast. >> thank you. >>> dna technology that can catch metal thieves. how it works and why it's not being used in the bay area. >> the jersey shore in ruins from sandy. a look at the catastrophe, the clean-up and why storm victims are turning on each other. ,, ,, ,,,,,,,, owner in san francisco. some und bronze >>> thomas the hippopotamus is in pieces but finally back with its owner in san francisco. somebody stole the statue in sutro heights four years ago. today police returned it to the rightful owner. >> i knew he would come back. i just knew it. i just felt that, first of all, nobody would say that it's scrap metal. >> now, if the thief had sold the statue to metal recyclers, that person could probably get a few hundred dollars for it. police found the hippo during a drug bust friday, made an arrest. the owner plans to weld thomas back together. >>> for years now we have told you about the rash of metal thefts just like that one and how much it ends up costing bay area cities utilities people. but there is dna-like technology that can catch a metal thief redhanded. cbs 5
governor romney. liz: i'm sitting there looking at one of your picks you like, it's technology. i'm thinking technology doesn't work when you have no electricity. we need to also look more broadly than just the storm. this is affecting the northeast. there's the midwest. there's california. there's texas. they have lots of energy. why do you like technology right now? >> not just in the consumer, not in the mobile phones, but technology is one of those trends that affects every industry. it affects healthcare. it affects energy. energy we saw the new natural gas fracking that's bringing enormous supplies to the market. we could be energy independent because of the technology applied to energy. liz: yet you don't like energy, you say avoid energy. >> who is the biggest beneficiary of this new supply is really the consumers, and the businesses have low cost gas, natural gas has plummeted in price, so that actually hurts in an ironic way the producers of energy, benefits the consumers of energy. liz: that's why we have doug here to kind of help our brains go through the scenario of w
the mayor came to us with a very precise question which was how can all of this data and technology help us to change and make the city more sustainable. if the go to copenhagen, traffic in the city looks like this. you had a lot of cars in the city center. now they have 30% or 50% every day. you have this bicycle idea. i do not know if we can put the audio. this will give your energy. despite changing the will you will save the energy. we can monitor what you are doing. they can collect information. all of these things you can share with your friends. you can put it on facebook. it is a very good way to increase the number of sites in copenhagen. instead collecting air miles, you collect green miles. this was the initial prototype. now we have these in cars. we are getting very close to its. hopefully, it will be here next year. >> come up on the stage. this is the vice president and director of the metropolitan policy program at the brookings institution. he will be joined by a bunch of other panelists for how far can innovations take our cities. >> thanks. while they get ready, i
concentration in technology, we are offering the cheapest electricity in sunny areas compared to other systems. >> the award was presented to this solar entrepreneur as the industry faces tough times. a former prize winner's solar energy business is shedding around 1000 jobs. sma makes solar-technology components called power converters, essential into putting power into the grid. chinese composition and cuts to subsidies have hit his company hard. >> we need the government to support -- to provide support for german manufacturers. we need stronger funding for research and development, and we need an easy way to access funds. >> researchers agree. they are already experimenting with technology they say could bring even more light into their mini-panel, the kind of break through the company needs to compete. >> it time for a brief look at some of the other stories making news around the world. israel has launched three air strikes on gaza. the israeli military says it was targeting our rocket-launching site and militant base. the exchange of fire comes three days after both sides accepted an un
of subway tunnels? throw a few shamwow's down there. we have the technology! god, please. don't make me go on that bus with those people again. they wore denim, everywhere. (laughter) now folks, if you watched this show you know i don't like to jump to conclusions. i make conclusions come to me. this is tip of the hat, wag of the finger. (cheers and applause) nation, there is nothing i love more than taking pictures with my iphone. it is so convenient. when i was a kid we had to duct tape a polaroid camera to our rotary phone. bonus t held 20 songs if you also hot glued a record player to it. and the best part about this little technological marvel is that it allows me to document my life wrefer i go from concerts to family gatherings, to spontaneous eruptions of applause for from my studio audience. (cheers and applause) how lucky i have this thing. sadly, even with my iphone there are still memorable moments that i miss. well, a swedish company has created a new device that will solve that problem. >> sometimes the best moments in life are the simple ones so we started thinking if we cou
combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. that bringing you better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?! we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, and we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. [car alarm blaring] call now and also ask about our 24/7 support and service. call... and l
technology is dying out all together. as always with great change comes great opportunity. digital technology has the capity bri neorms of reading and new modes of publication. but to understand what the future of the book might look like t helps to appreciate some of its past. >> the manuscript library was built in 1963. its white all was ter shell has no windows this is to protect the treasures within. we're joined by david who is currently writing his own history of the book. >> books aren't going away. i mean i think and the question is what role they will play seems to me its thing that is hard toast pdict. one of the things that is really remarkable is as europe made the transition from world dominated by manuscript and manuscript proud the text that were bound into books, and by the end of the 15th century the print technology takes root. you find lots of people saying oh this print technology, it's very interesting. it's very efficient but everyone has access to everything, there are no controls. one doesn't really know if this thing has any real authority. the vocabulary in which an
the sensata technologies plant to protest plans to move the factory to china, ending 170 jobs. a federal appeals court has rejected the group plan. his challenge of a funding ban in taxes. texas has sought to cut payments to planned parenthood and exclude it from a government funded health program for low- income women because it also provides abortions. the texas program offers cancer and health screenings as well as birth control to some 100,000 low-income women, about 40,000 of whom are served through planned parenthood. the court of appeals for the but circuit in new orleans declined to reconsider an earlier ruling upholding the ban. in response, texas governor rick perry immediately announced that texas will stop all payments to program participants affiliated with abortion providers. a recent george washington university study has warned texas will be unlikely to provide adequate care to the patients currently served by planned parenthood. the supreme court is set to decide today on whether to hear a challenge to the conviction of five former top officials with the holy land founda
quarter, the most significant area of growth in ohio is investment technology. i.p. we have groan financial services. we have grown health care. look, there's been significant investment by auto companies in ohio. they are reducing their footprint. i wish we could get more here. i just met with the delphi team trying to get more business there. but, i mean, let's be fair about this. the fact is, the bureau of labor statistics said when you take everything into account, companies and suppliers we are up 400 jobs. we did not grow by relying on one industry or one sector. we have done it by diversifying ohio and making it safe for people to come in here. i called ceos in other states and they are interested in what we are doing here. there are no surprises coming. when there are no surprises, investors and business people, job creators think it's safe to go there. the proof is in the pudding. >> let me ask you about unemployment. whoever is responsible for the success in ohio, governor romney doesn't seem impressed. this is what he said speaking earlier this month to the columbia dis
's face it, the middle class was getting hammered, long before the financial crisis hit. technology made us more productive but also made a lot of good jobs obsolete. global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also allowed companies to hire in low-wage countries. american workers saw their paychecks squeezed, even as corporate profits rose and ceos' salaries exploded and pensions and health care slowly started disappearing. and these fundamental changes in the economy, the rise of technology and global competition, they're real. we can't wish these and global competition wlsh here's what i know, wisconsin, we can meet that because we're americans, and we have the world's best workers and the world's best aupt paren irs. we have the best scientists and the best researchers, the best colleges and ooufrtsz, and we've got the most innovative spirit. we have everything we need to thrive in this new economy. in this new century and there's not a country in the earth that wouldn't change places with the united states of america. but we have a choice to make. in five days we will choose ou
hammered long before the financial crisis hit. technology made us more productive, but it also made a lot of good jobs obsolete. global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also allowed companies to hire in low-wage countries. american workers saw their paychecks squeezed, even as corporate profits rose and ceo salaries exploded. and the guaranteed security of pensions and health care slowly started disappearing. in these fundamental changes in the economy, the rise of technology and global competition, they're real. can' away. but here's what i know, wisconsin. we can meet them. because we're americans. we've got the world's best workers and the best entrepreneurs. we've got the best scientists and the best researchers. the best colleges and universities, and we've got the most innovative spirit. we have everything we need to thrive in this new economy in this new century, and there's not a country on earth that wouldn't trade places with the united states of america. but we have a choice to make. in five days we will choose our next president. and it's more than just a choice betwe
technologies like clean energy and fuel efficient cars. we know that our country is stronger when we can count on affordable health insurance and medicare and social security. when we protect our kids from toxic dumping and mercury pollution. when there are rules in place to make sure we're not taking advantage of by credit card companies or mortgage lenders or unscrupulous financial institutions. we know we're better off when politicians in washington aren't allowed to make decisions about health care that women are perfectly capable of making for themselves. that's what we believe. that's the vision that we embrace. i appreciate that. governor romney now, he's got an entirely different view about what this country is about. don't boo. vote. vote. he's been running around saying he's got a five-point plan for the economy. turns out it's a one-point plan. those at the top get to play by a different set of rules than you do. they get to pay lower tax rates. outsource jobs, they want to let wall street run wild, make reckless bets with other folks' money. that was the philosophy as ceo, as gover
to fully implement technological improvements. muni says -- they give us a list -- muni gave us a list of improvements that are under way. they say these will reduce the need for switchbacks. the jury answers, "the jury appreciates the efforts being made. we are glad some of these are partially accomplished and others coming in the future. many systems we interviewed had these technologys in place. we would like muni to have a sense of urgency about the improvements and concerned about the term "under way" and completion dates that are years away" . on f8 which concerns a new control center lacking adequate operating personnel and f9 muni has failed to conduct and publish rider survey and muni agreed with both of these findings. as far as the recommendations, the first recommendation is to eliminate switchbacks except when unavoidable. muni disagrees with the recommendation reasserting that switch backs are valid and necessary given the operating environment. they have worked on reducing the switchbacks and keeping the public informed and would further denigate service and safet
of that technology. i congratulate him on taking out osama bin laden. i want to underscore the same point that the president made. i supported his action there. i felt the same as the president did. >> i think romney is leaning obama. >> it did not last long? >> we haven't heard an agenda for the president. >> team obama knows full steam ahead. the president went on a two-day battleground blitz this week or, as he calls it -- >> our 48-hour fly around campaign marathon extravaganza. >> speaking of extravaganza, did you hear about donald trump's big, huge, mega game changing bombshell announcement of president obama? yeah, neither did we. he did come out with this -- >> if barack obama opens up and gives his college records and applications and if he gives his passport applications -- >> you get the point. but the president got the last laugh. >> this all dates back to when we were growing up together in kenya. >> and from big hair to big bird. >> i'm glad to be the way i am. >> the halloween costume is already sold out this year with one man to thank. >> i like pbs, i love big bird. >> an
believe we have enough technology that we can prevent that to ever happen. of course, if they were a threat to america, we do have to take decisive action, we do have to show our might, and we have to make sure. but i don't want to get it to that point because, ladies and gentlemen, we have the technology. their bombs are not sophisticated enough, and they don't have it. we need to prevent them from getting that technology. we need to stop that immediately. but, of course, if our, if our sovereignty was ever threatened or our friends in the middle east, we need to go after them. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: much of what scott has said i agree with, we have to protect our friends in the middle east, and that certainly includes israel. i just want everybody to know how deeply i feel about protecting israel. but also doing well with moderate arab nations so that we can have a relationship over there. but let's face it, we simply cannot allow iran that is dedicated to to blitz ration of israel -- the obliteration of israel and others have a nuclear weapon. we're not going to let
something 70% full timers 20 years ago to now 70% part-timers. they are also using new technology that sets employee hours by tracking the ebb and flow of customer traffic. >> technology destroys jobs. >> reporter: for people like karen, part time is enough time for now. >> hoping this will be the start of the next big thing for me. >> reporter: so the jobs market is gaining momentum but many of those out there are paying less and less. meanwhile, the paragon outlet mall in livermore is in the process of hiring more than 2,000 part time and full-time workers. in livermore, elissa harrington, cbs 5. >> a new poll shows a dramatic shift in the way californians think about the death penalty. cbs 5 political reporter grace lee on how they may be ready to end capital punishment here. grace. >> reporter: records the field poll has been asking this questions for six decades typically they would vote no supporting the death penalty. right now at this time in fact cycle most people vote no if they're undecided. that's not what we're seeing in this poll. it surprised a lot of people including the fie
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percent. energy falling 1.7%. and technology down 1.5% falling commodity prices weighed on some of their respective stock sectors. oil fell more than two dollars per barrel, settling at its lowest price since june. the u.s. dollar was higher on the back of the employment numbers and a more expensive dollar can put downward pressure on oil. oil giant chevron also hurt the energy sector and the dow. chevron had the biggest percentage loss among dow stocks. chevron did not make as much money has anticipated in the third quarter. earnings per share were well short of estimates. similar to exxon mobil, chevron also saw its production and fuel sales fall, hit by hurricane isaac in august, legal troubles in braziand a refiry fire in california. shares fell 2.8%, closing at their lowest price since july. two bright spots for chevron were its smaller refineries processing cheaper oil from montana and north dakota. meantime, chesapeake energy fell to a three month low, down 7.9%. the company has been trying to reduce its massive debt load. today the company said it may delay cutting its i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 588 (some duplicates have been removed)

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